The importance of authenticity and commitment

Fern growing on Land Rover

Making the most of the environment or, you don’t always find what you expect.

This is my last reflective post for the ‘How to Teach Online’ MOOC (or TOMOOC to its many friends). You might not know it from my abysmal level of participation but I have valued being part of this cMOOC and have learnt from it – though as I now look back on the course some of my learning has been unexpected and tangential to the expected outcomes.

One very personal time management / motivation type lesson I will take away is that trying to engage with a cMOOC (and I suspect that an xMOOC might have been different in this regard) whilst navigating through potential redundancy / redeployment and starting a new job is not a great idea. Although I read other people’s blog posts, commenting on them soon gave way to writing job applications and preparing for interviews. I think we all came to realise that to get the most out of a cMOOC you need to put a lot in and on this occasion I just wasn’t able to do that – sorry.

My second lesson relates again to my motivation but also to the issue of authenticity which came through strongly in the later stages of the course. I do not really think of myself as someone who ‘teaches online’ in a straightforward sense. I do create online resources from which I hope people learn, but that is not exactly the same thing (my earlier blog post on hybrid teaching discussed this).

I signed up for this MOOC because I wanted to learn about teaching online so that I could pass on what I had learned to academic colleagues who are doing more ‘hybrid teaching’ than I am and may in the future want to explore fully online modules. I should have known better. When I run a workshop I always offer opportunities for participants to relate the material to their own context and wherever possible sessions revolve around learning-by-doing. The tutors of this MOOC had taken a similar approach so I found myself in a dilemma. I either had to do mental gymnastics and try to put myself in the position(s) of imaginary faculty colleagues as I went through the various activities, or tackle them from my perspective in which case they were not only trickier (see above) but promised less in terms of useful lessons for the future.

At least I took something positive from approaching an authentic learning experience in an inauthentic way – knots of inactivity but lots of reflection on the importance of real, authentic, problem-based, practice-based learning.

I also took on board some important principles for teaching online, though there was no ‘great secret’ there. Good pedagogy is good pedagogy wherever it happens, but you do have to think about that context / environment and plan the teaching and learning to make the most of the environment and tools at your disposal (see image).

I have encountered lots of interesting material (which I have tagged and stored for future reference) in recorded webinars, the set readings and on participants’ blogs and G+ posts.

My PLN has been positively enhanced and I hope to carry on sharing with many of you via social media channels in the future (you can find all my links at about.me/anne_hole).

Overall then, I have learned some valuable lessons about my learning, about teaching online and offline and about cMOOCs.

Many thanks to everyone on the course team and behind the scenes and to everyone who has participated in this community of online learning.

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